Posts tagged "republic"

Louisiana, USA – For a Great Vacation

No other state in the USA has as colorful a history as Louisiana.

It has been governed under 10 different Flags and it became an independent republic for six weeks before joining immediately joining the Confederacy.

In 1803 President Jefferson knew the importance of trade and this state’s economy, so he charted a deal with Napoleon.

Due to its fertile lands and solid trading opportunities, Louisiana soon became the wealthiest state in the US and promoted the growth of cotton and sugar.

Agriculture suffered badly during the civil war, but with sulfur found in 1869 and oil in 1901, the state became a hub in the oil and natural gas industry and it stays that way even today.

The main content at Audubon State Historic Site is Oakley House complete with boarding facilities for you to stay.

After finalizing its permanent boundary, Fort Jesup State Historic Site was built in 1822 and remained a military post for almost 25 years. It served the purpose of defense for the American Military forces during war with the Mexicans.

Plaquemine Lock State Historic Site was built to control the wild waters of Mississippi River. They were a bane for the traders and as it used to flood the low lying areas. To control them, the Lock was fabricated and when completed in 1909, it was the only Lock in the world to lift water up to 51 feet.

Today it has become an irresistible site for the tourists.

America’s large American Rose Center Gardens have huge pines and different roses for smelling.

Louisiana’s largest water theme park, Blue Bayou Water Park has watery games and amenities for you to indulge in.

With animals in a garden like situation, Greater Baton Rouge Zoo has lots of reptiles too. Why not take a train ride to see them.

Aquarium of the Americans, one of the best 5 Aquariums in the USA has millions of gallons full of Gulf of Mexico water. It has the largest collection of sharks and jellyfish in the world.

At Poverty Point State Historic Park you will find the native earthworks of people who lived here 12 centuries before Christ and the museum offers a guided tour.

Los Adaes used to be the focal point of native Americans, the Spanish and also the French. They used to stay and trade with each other at various points.

This 14 acres site was built by the Spanish in the 1700s and it provides full historical and archaeological knowledge of the time.

How about going aboard the Paddle Wheeler Creole Queen for a cruise trip and then enjoy great music, dinner, jazz and atmosphere.

Bayou Segnette State Park is full of enjoyable pastimes based around water activities and you can watch wildlife. Keep your eyes open for different types of birds and animals while you go about having your fun.

Fontainebleau State Park derives its name from a Paris forest by the same name. It was created by a sugar producer in 1829 and you can still see the brick ruins of sugar mills today.

You can also see the lavish lifestyle that he used to live in. This area is constructed around Lake Pontchartrain.

Jackie Mansfield

http://www.articlesbase.com/travel-articles/louisiana-usa-for-a-great-vacation-677283.html

9 comments - What do you think?
Posted by admin - December 14, 2013 at 11:13 pm

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags: , , , , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 3

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:4:52

Read more…

4 comments - What do you think?
Posted by admin - March 21, 2013 at 5:23 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 2

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:6:4

Read more…

13 comments - What do you think?
Posted by admin - August 29, 2010 at 4:54 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 1

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:4:1

Read more…

21 comments - What do you think?
Posted by admin -  at 4:54 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,