Posts tagged "new"

New Orleans, Louisiana by Erik Hastings

Travel Show Live Host Erik Hastings tours New Orleans, Louisiana, one of America’s most sensual destinations, rich with history, culture, architecture, cuisine, music, and 24-hour entertainment. The French Quarter, Arts District, Garden District, Riverfront, and Downtown, are open for business and going strong with great attractions and values for visitors.

Duration : 0:4:1

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Posted by mark - August 25, 2015 at 9:06 pm

Categories: Louisiana Travel   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Voodoo Music Festival – Day 3

Voodoo Music Festival in New Orleans, Artist summary of Day 3.

Duration : 0:2:33

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Posted by mark - August 24, 2015 at 8:49 pm

Categories: Louisiana Travel   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Clarence Frogman Henry Always Hurt The One You Love/But I Do

Louisiana Music Hall Of Fame 2007 Inductee Clarence “Frogman” Henry at his induction performance in April of 2007 in Mandeville, LA, performance clips from his classics “You Always Hurt The One You Love”, “I Don’t Know Why I Love You, But I Do” and “I’m A Lonely Frog”. More information on Clarence Henry and all the Louisiana Music Hall Of Fame Inductees can be found at www.lmhof.org. More Louisiana Music Hall Of Fame Artists induction performance highlights can also be found on You Tube. The Louisiana Music Hall Of Fame web site at www.lmhof.org features thousands of static images and videos along with bios and articles on our Inductees. Please visit LMHOF and learn about our amazing artists and music history in Louisiana. LMHOF is a non profit organization dedicated to preserving the musical heritage of Louisiana.

Duration : 0:5:34

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Posted by mark - August 18, 2015 at 6:09 pm

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CORPORATE ENTERTAINMENT Chubby Carrier ZYDECO Music, Louisiana Music

The Official Chubby Carrier Promo Video!
The Chubby party was in full swing at Downtown Alive in Lafayette Louisiana!
Watch as Chubby throws down some kickin’ zydeco music and rocks the crowd of all ages!
You can feel the energy on the stage when you watch this live performance. Doesn’t get any better than this Louisiana Zydeco Music Entertainer! If you like Buckwheat Zydeco and Rockin Dopsie, you’re going to love Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band!

Duration : 0:4:41

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Posted by mark - August 12, 2015 at 3:51 pm

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bamboula 2000 @ Louisiana Music Factory 2010

CDs Available @ Link Below
http://www.louisianamusicfactory.com
Louisiana Music Factory
Bamboula 2000
June 26, 2010
New CD – We Got It Goin’ On

Duration : 0:10:45

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Posted by mark - July 30, 2015 at 6:47 am

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Turnip Greens @ Louisiana Music Factory 2010

CDs Available @ Link Below
http://www.louisianamusicfactory.com
Louisiana Music Factory
Turnip Greens
July 10, 2010

Duration : 0:10:0

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Posted by mark - July 9, 2015 at 9:29 pm

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 3

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:4:52

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Posted by mark - June 20, 2015 at 2:59 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 2

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:6:4

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Posted by mark - June 16, 2015 at 12:37 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Theresa Andersson @ LMF 2008 PT2

CDs Available @ Link Below
http://www.louisianamusicfactory.com
Theresa Andersson
Louisiana Music Factory In-Store
September 6, 2008

Duration : 0:10:36

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Posted by mark - June 14, 2015 at 12:01 pm

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

World Cultural Economic Forum | WCEF

The World Cultural Economic Forum (WCEF) takes place throughout Louisiana in October with
three key components including a two-day Forum in New Orleans Oct. 30-31 for global cultural
economy leaders to discuss best practices for growing cultural industries; a World Bazaar and
Marketplace showcasing artisans and vendors from around the world in the Ernest N. Morial
Convention Center Oct. 30-Nov. 1; and the Passport Events across the state throughout October showcasing all of Louisianas unique cultural assets.

The core segments of the cultural economy include design, entertainment (film, music, live entertainment, and performing arts), literary arts and humanities, visual arts, culinary arts, and historic preservation.

The WCEF will shine the light on Louisianas cultural industries and showcase its unique heritage and cultural assets while at the same time welcoming national and international visitors for a global dialogue on the world cultural economy.

Duration : 0:7:11

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Posted by mark - June 7, 2015 at 9:46 am

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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