Posts tagged "French"

Louisiana Creole Heritage Tribute

The Louisiana Creole Heritage Center in Natchitoches, Louisiana is asking for a small membership fee of 8 dollars a month to help them stay open. They are at high risk of closing due to budget cuts. Please spread the word!

Duration : 0:2:19

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Posted by admin - June 28, 2014 at 4:09 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , ,

New Orleans, Louisiana by Erik Hastings

Travel Show Live Host Erik Hastings tours New Orleans, Louisiana, one of America’s most sensual destinations, rich with history, culture, architecture, cuisine, music, and 24-hour entertainment. The French Quarter, Arts District, Garden District, Riverfront, and Downtown, are open for business and going strong with great attractions and values for visitors.

Duration : 0:4:1

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Posted by admin - June 20, 2014 at 12:08 pm

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Betty’s Faux French Chocolate Beignets Recipe

In this video, Betty demonstrates how to make Faux French Beignets. This is a quick and easy way to make chocolate beignets, using ordinary ingredients from your kitchen, and you don’t need to be a French pastry chef to make these! I found out how to make these by watching a TV show, “Chefs of the Bluegrass,” which had a segment featuring Furlongs, an upscale restaurant in Lexington, Kentucky. The theme of the restaurant is thoroughbred racing, but the style of food is Cajun. This is a great place to find wonderful jambalaya or etoufee! The owner and the chef are both from the New Orleans area, and they offered this quick recipe for beignets on the “Chefs of the Bluegrass” show, and I wanted to pass it along to you!

Ingredients:

canned refrigerated biscuits
semisweet chocolate chips
peanut oil
confectioner’s sugar

Remove regrigerated biscuits from their can. Individually, stretch each biscuit into a circle of dough. Place a few chocolate chips on the dough. Fold the dough in half, enclosing the chocolate chips. Use your fingers to pinch the edges together, so that you have a crescent of dough that completely encloses the chocolate chips. Make sure there are not holes in the dough or gaps in the edges. Meanwhile, heat about 1 inch of peanut oil in a heavy pot to 350 degrees. When the oil is hot enough, carefully place a chocolate-filled crescent into the hot oil. The dough of the crescent should sizzle. The beignet will cook very quickly. When it is brown on the bottom, let it roll over in the oil to brown the other side. When brown on both sides, remove from oil, and place on paper toweling to drain. Quickly roll the beignet in a container of confectioner’s sugar to coat all over. The beignet is ready to eat! You may do several at a time and place them on a nice serving plate. They are excellent when served warm, but still great after they have cooled. Enjoy!!! –Betty :)

Duration : 0:8:14

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Posted by admin - June 6, 2014 at 6:59 am

Categories: Louisiana Cooking   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Steak tips with mushrooms in demi glace

with other stuff

Duration : 0:8:58

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Posted by admin - May 11, 2014 at 7:17 pm

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New Orleans – The Way It Was

Music used with permission.
Just weeks before hurricane Katrina, I visited New Orleans for several days and this montage is a look back at the way life was before the hurricane.

Duration : 0:5:42

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Posted by admin - May 2, 2014 at 2:36 pm

Categories: Louisiana Travel   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

New Orleans / Sunway Travel Group

New Orleans, Louisiana known as The Big Easy, is open 24 hours a day and dates back to the 1700′s representing more than 250 years of French, Spanish and American culture. Bohemian, opulent, mysterious, historical and indulgent are all words that are used to described New Orleans.

As you walk through the historic districts you will experience the architecture, music, history, culture and hospitality that the south is renowned for as well as the uniqueness of New Orleans. Enjoy the abundance of attractions: Museums, natural history, street cars, historic districts, shopping, dinning, riverboats and Mardi Gras – one of over 600 festivals that New Orleans & Louisiana have to offer.

Duration : 0:2:32

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Posted by admin - April 10, 2014 at 3:17 am

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New Orleans Louisiana Creole Cajun Zydeco Music. Blues & Jazz of Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday NOLA Saints

New Orleans (pronounced /nuːˈɔliənz, nuːˈɔlənz/ locally and often pronounced /nuːɔrˈliːnz/ in most other US dialects French: La Nouvelle-Orléans is a major United States port city and the largest city in Louisiana. New Orleans is the center of the Greater New Orleans metropolitan area, the largest metro area in the state.

New Orleans is located in southeastern Louisiana, straddling the Mississippi River. It is coextensive with Orleans Parish, meaning that the boundaries of the city and the parish are the same. It is bounded by the parishes of St. Tammany (north), St. Bernard (east), Plaquemines (south), and Jefferson (south and west). Lake Pontchartrain, part of which is included in the city limits, lies to the north, and Lake Borgne lies to the east.
The city is named after Philippe II, Duc d’Orléans, Regent of France, and is one of the oldest cities in the United States. It is well known for its multicultural and multilingual heritage, cuisine, architecture, music (particularly as the birthplace of jazz), and its annual Mardi Gras and other celebrations and festivals. The city is often referred to as the “most unique” city in America

La Nouvelle-Orléans (New Orleans) was founded May 7, 1718, by the French Mississippi Company, under the direction of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville on land inhabited by the Chitimacha. It was named for Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, who was Regent of France at the time; his title came from the French city of Orléans. The French colony was ceded to the Spanish Empire in the Treaty of Paris (1763) and remained under Spanish control until 1801, when it reverted to French control. Most of the surviving architecture of the Vieux Carré (French Quarter) dates from this Spanish period. Napoleon sold the territory to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. The city grew rapidly with influxes of Americans, French, and Creole French. Major commodity crops of sugar and cotton were cultivated with slave labor on large plantations outside the city.

The Haitian Revolution of 1804 established the second republic in the Western Hemisphere and the first led by blacks. Haitian refugees both white and free people of color (affranchis) arrived in New Orleans, often bringing slaves with them. While Governor Claiborne and other officials wanted to keep out more free black men, French Creoles wanted to increase the French-speaking population. As more refugees were allowed in Louisiana, Haitian émigrés who had gone to Cuba also arrived. Nearly 90 percent of the new immigrants settled in New Orleans. The 1809 migration brought 2,731 whites; 3,102 free persons of African descent; and 3,226 enslaved refugees to the city, doubling its French-speaking population.

During the War of 1812, the British sent a force to conquer the city. The Americans decisively defeated the British troops, led by Sir Edward Pakenham, in the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815.

As a principal port, New Orleans had the major role of any city during the antebellum era in the slave trade. Its port handled huge quantities of goods for export from the interior and import from other countries to be traded up the Mississippi River. The river was filled with steamboats, flatboats, and sailing ships. At the same time, it had the most prosperous community of free persons of color in the South, who were often educated and middle-class property owners.

The population of the city doubled in the 1830s, and by 1840 New Orleans had become the wealthiest and third-most populous city in the nation. It had the largest slave market. Two-thirds of the more than one million slaves brought to the Deep South arrived via the forced migration of the internal slave trade. The money generated by sales of slaves in the Upper South has been estimated at fifteen percent of the value of the staple crop economy. The slaves represented half a billion dollars in property, and an ancillary economy grew up around the trade in slaves – for transportation, housing and clothing, fees, etc., estimated at 13.5 percent of the price per person. All this amounted to tens of billions of dollars during the antebellum period, with New Orleans as a prime beneficiary.

The Union captured New Orleans early in the American Civil War, sparing the city the destruction suffered by many other cities of the American South.

Duration : 0:3:25

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Posted by admin - February 4, 2014 at 2:41 am

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Why is Texas culture so much lamer than Louisiana culture?

Lousiana culture does seem much more diverse. There are many cajuns still living in a subsistence economy based on hunting, fishing, and gardening. The cajun and creole cuisine is rarely found elsewhere, at least not in high quality. The above-ground cemeteries adds a touch of mystique along with the voodoo history. Louisiana’s dark past as a slave-port and holding place for incoming slaves is a curious look at a gut-wrenching period of U.S. history. People from Lousiana seem to have learned a way to cook any part of any animal and make it a delicacy. Whether it’s soft-shell crabs, or sucking the head out of a crawdad, or turtle soup, they don’t miss much. The French, Carribean, and African influence on dialect and cuisine can’t be missed. The greatest Creole restaurants in the world are in New Orleans, IMHO. Commander’s Palace, Brennans, Arnauds, K-Paul’s, Antoine’s, just to name a few of my favorites. And Jackson Square with it’s Cafe du Monde’s beignets and chickory coffee are an interesting experience.

Texas was largely populated by Czechs, Poles, and Germans. They seemed to assimilate into a homogenized Texan culture much more completely. The main cultural interest in Texas now seems Hispanic. Tex-Mex food and BBQ seems to be the bulk of the Texan cuisine. The best steaks are still in Kansas City. I love visiting Texas to be sure. They are a proud and patriotic people. But their cutural heritage is not so rich and diverse as it is in Louisiana. Texas is wealthier, more modern, with more malls, high-rises, extravagant modern hotels, etc. While New Orleans has more boutique hotels with very attentive staff that take great pride in using your name at every encounter. Louisiana, on the other hand, even before Katrina, was a city largely forgotten when it comes to building standards, and remaining eyesores of buildings that plainly need serious structural improvements for safety and many half-demolished buidings.

Each state has its plusses and minuses, but Lousiana culture remains richer and more diverse in my opinion.

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Posted by admin - April 17, 2013 at 6:40 am

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Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 3

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:4:52

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Posted by admin - March 21, 2013 at 5:23 pm

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Zydeco: Creole Music and Culture in Rural Louisiana

1986 Nick Spitzer film on African American dance-hall music in French-speaking southwest Louisiana, with Dolon Carriere, Armand Ardoin, and Alphonse Bois Sec Ardoin.

Music performed by Bebe Carriere, Eraste Carriere, Delton Broussard, The Ardoin Brothers, Jon Delafose and the Eunice Playboys, and Clinvin Jones and Friends.

Duration : 0:1:58

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Posted by admin - January 30, 2013 at 4:10 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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