Posts tagged "French"

New Orleans, Louisiana by Erik Hastings

Travel Show Live Host Erik Hastings tours New Orleans, Louisiana, one of America’s most sensual destinations, rich with history, culture, architecture, cuisine, music, and 24-hour entertainment. The French Quarter, Arts District, Garden District, Riverfront, and Downtown, are open for business and going strong with great attractions and values for visitors.

Duration : 0:4:1

Read more…

10 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - March 1, 2016 at 5:15 pm

Categories: Louisiana Travel   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

New Orleans – The Way It Was

Music used with permission.
Just weeks before hurricane Katrina, I visited New Orleans for several days and this montage is a look back at the way life was before the hurricane.

Duration : 0:5:42

Read more…

24 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - February 9, 2016 at 1:46 am

Categories: Louisiana Travel   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Louisiana Creole Heritage Tribute

The Louisiana Creole Heritage Center in Natchitoches, Louisiana is asking for a small membership fee of 8 dollars a month to help them stay open. They are at high risk of closing due to budget cuts. Please spread the word!

Duration : 0:2:19

Read more…

7 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - February 1, 2016 at 10:40 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , ,

New Orleans / Sunway Travel Group

New Orleans, Louisiana known as The Big Easy, is open 24 hours a day and dates back to the 1700’s representing more than 250 years of French, Spanish and American culture. Bohemian, opulent, mysterious, historical and indulgent are all words that are used to described New Orleans.

As you walk through the historic districts you will experience the architecture, music, history, culture and hospitality that the south is renowned for as well as the uniqueness of New Orleans. Enjoy the abundance of attractions: Museums, natural history, street cars, historic districts, shopping, dinning, riverboats and Mardi Gras – one of over 600 festivals that New Orleans & Louisiana have to offer.

Duration : 0:2:32

Read more…

5 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - January 25, 2016 at 5:53 pm

Categories: Louisiana Travel   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Passing the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans

Passing the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans.

Duration : 0:4:8

Read more…

10 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - December 15, 2015 at 12:37 am

Categories: Louisiana Travel   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

LOUISIANA CREOLE FLAG

Pete Bergeron designed the Louisiana Creole flag in 1987 and, in 1995, the Lafayette-based organization C.R.E.O.L.E., Inc., a heritage preservation group, adopted the flag to represent the cultural and ethnic diversity of Creole Louisiana. Dolores Kay Conque, Bergeron’s sister, hand-stitched the first Creole flag.

The upper left section, a white fleur de lis on a blue field, represents Louisiana’s French heritage. On the lower left and upper right sections, West African heritage is represented, respectively, by the flags of Mali and Senegal. Spanish colonial heritage is depicted by the Tower of Castille — a gold tower on a red field — positioned at the lower right section of the flag. A white cross dividing the four quadrants serves as a symbol of religion in the region.

Historically, Louisiana Creoles share deep cultural and kinship ties not only with Mediterranean Europeans, West Africans and Native Americans, but, as well, with the people of Cuba and Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic).

Duration : 0:4:18

Read more…

24 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - December 1, 2015 at 8:06 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Apart from Louisiana, is there still a lot of French culture in the South?

I was watching the Golden Girls, and the character Blanche Devereaux from Virginia is very Southern but has a French name

The french colonized up and down the eastern seaboard, so you’ll find french surnames. But no, there isnt any french speaking towns like in louisiana. Some places in Vermont, but thats up north.

7 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - November 12, 2015 at 12:30 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 3

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:4:52

Read more…

4 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - June 20, 2015 at 2:59 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 2

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:6:4

Read more…

13 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - June 16, 2015 at 12:37 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Louisiana Culinary Institute (LCI)

Louisiana Culinary Institute is the premeir culinary school of the South. Producing world class chefs is what we do. Call or email us with any questions or inquires and come tour our brand new 30,000 sq ft state-of-the-art- facility 877-769-8820 or info@louisianaculinary.com

Duration : 0:0:31

Read more…

4 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - February 22, 2015 at 5:28 pm

Categories: Louisiana Cooking   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Next Page »