Posts tagged "creole"

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 2

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:6:4

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Posted by mark - February 23, 2017 at 1:32 am

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

BBQ Barbeque stuff 007bondjb

BOY!

Duration : 0:3:44

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Posted by mark - January 24, 2017 at 9:17 am

Categories: Louisiana Cooking   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

***LOUISIANA RESIDENTS*** What is your opinion of the grants for grads program?

I’ve read a lot and did a some research, now I would like to know the opinion of the citizens. The Grants for Grads Program is established in recognition that many Louisiana’s residents relocate from Louisiana upon completion of their college careers due to a perceived lack of economic opportunity. Homeownership reflects a commitment to remain in Louisiana and continue the tradition and culture of the state.

The grants for grads awards any Louisiana resident who has received an associate, baccalaureate, masters/postgraduate degree on or after January 1, 2008 and was:

As a LA resident I have been very aware of the outflow of LA college graduates. I have never heard of this program, but I see the need for it and I will definitely look into it.

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Posted by mark - January 15, 2017 at 5:18 am

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , ,

Where in louisiana do they sale cooked alligator meat ?


Places like by Bayou Areas. Little stores. In Grand Isle, Carrenco, And In Baton Rouge..

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Posted by mark - December 27, 2016 at 4:59 pm

Categories: Louisiana Cooking   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Cajun vs Creole Cooking?

What are the similarities and differences? Is this type of cooking only found in Louisiana or any other states?

Cajun cook tends to be more French influenced since the Cajuns are descendants of the French Acadians.

Creole cooking is more influenced by African-Caribbean (which include French and Spanish) cooking styles.

But to be honest, there is not really a big difference between the two since they’re all part of the cuisine in Louisiana.

I would say that cajun food can be spicier than creole food, but other than that the two are very similar.

Maybe it’s the cook that’s making the dish?

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Posted by mark - December 20, 2016 at 1:31 pm

Categories: Louisiana Cooking   Tags: , , , , , ,

Is there any casinos in Louisiana that has a sports book?


No, the only U.S. state with sportsbooks is Nevada.

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Posted by mark - March 5, 2016 at 6:48 pm

Categories: Louisiana Sports   Tags: , , , , , ,

Louisiana Swamp Country A Taste Of Life On The Pearl River Bayou

Entire film is available on Amazon.com and Ebay. Documentary 1 hour long. Song, Pearl River People, by Charlie Blanchard. Down Of The Pearl River Bayou in Louisiana Honey Island Swamp, the River People serve up the good life. Whether it’s a houseboat reunion, an alligator rodeo, or the Annual Squirrel Hunt Festival, the fun centers around something good cooking under the cypress trees. These Swampers know how to have a good time and play a little homegrown music to get the fish frying and the party started. All they need is a boat to get there. The Entire Documentary Film is available online on Amazon.com and on Ebay. The film is 1 hour long on DVD.

Duration : 0:5:13

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Posted by mark - February 27, 2016 at 3:16 pm

Categories: Louisiana Cooking   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Louisiana Creole Heritage Tribute

The Louisiana Creole Heritage Center in Natchitoches, Louisiana is asking for a small membership fee of 8 dollars a month to help them stay open. They are at high risk of closing due to budget cuts. Please spread the word!

Duration : 0:2:19

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Posted by mark - February 1, 2016 at 10:40 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , ,

The culture of the Creole (native) in Louisiana emerged from the blending of:?

The culture of the Creole (native) in Louisiana emerged from the blending of:

a. Native American, French and Latino cultures
b. Native American, French and African American cultures
c. Latino, French and African American cultures
d. French, Portuguese and Native American cultures

E. None of the above… There is no evidence that Native Americans are in this mix.

Always a controversial and confusing term, the word Creole, to put it simply, means many things to many people. It derives from the Latin creare, meaning "to beget" or "create." After the New World’s discovery, Portuguese colonists used the word crioulo to denote a New World slave of African descent. Eventually, the word was applied to all New World colonists, regardless of ethnic origin, living along the Gulf Coast, especially in Louisiana. There the Spanish introduced the word as criollo, and during Louisiana’s colonial period (1699-1803) the evolving word Creole generally referred to persons of African or European heritage born in the New World. By the nineteenth century, black, white, and mixed-race Louisianians used the term to distinguish themselves from foreign-born and Anglo-American settlers. It was during that century that the mixed-race Creoles of Color (or gens de couleur libre, "free persons of color") came into their own as an ethnic group, enjoying many of the legal rights and privileges of whites. They occupied a middle ground between whites and enslaved blacks, and as such often possessed property and received formal educations. After the Civil War, most Creoles of Color lost their privileged status and joined the ranks of impoverished former black slaves. All the while, however, the word Creole persisted as a term also referring to white Louisianians, usually of upper-class, non-Cajun origin (although, confusingly, even Cajuns sometimes were called Creoles, primarily by outsiders unfamiliar with local ethnic labels). Like the Creoles of Color, these white Creoles (also called French Creoles) suffered socioeconomic decline after the Civil War. In Acadiana, newly impoverished white Creoles often intermarried with the predominantly lower-class Cajuns, and were largely assimilated into Cajun culture.

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Posted by mark - January 24, 2016 at 5:31 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

how can a person from baton rouge louisiana, amke it in the music industry if there not really no connections?


Get out there and market yourself..right not the SOUTH is hot..so you can use that as an advantage.

And ignore the other persons post:

It’s about time Baton Rouge rappers get out there with some common sense and business sense…Baton Rouge can’t play little brother to New Orleans forever..ex: who would have thought a rapper from mississippi would have blown up the way he did (DAVID BANNER)!

Good Luck to you!

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Posted by mark - January 18, 2016 at 3:01 pm

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags: , , , , , , ,

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