Louisiana Culture

The culture of the Creole (native) in Louisiana emerged from the blending of:?

The culture of the Creole (native) in Louisiana emerged from the blending of:

a. Native American, French and Latino cultures
b. Native American, French and African American cultures
c. Latino, French and African American cultures
d. French, Portuguese and Native American cultures

E. None of the above… There is no evidence that Native Americans are in this mix.

Always a controversial and confusing term, the word Creole, to put it simply, means many things to many people. It derives from the Latin creare, meaning "to beget" or "create." After the New World’s discovery, Portuguese colonists used the word crioulo to denote a New World slave of African descent. Eventually, the word was applied to all New World colonists, regardless of ethnic origin, living along the Gulf Coast, especially in Louisiana. There the Spanish introduced the word as criollo, and during Louisiana’s colonial period (1699-1803) the evolving word Creole generally referred to persons of African or European heritage born in the New World. By the nineteenth century, black, white, and mixed-race Louisianians used the term to distinguish themselves from foreign-born and Anglo-American settlers. It was during that century that the mixed-race Creoles of Color (or gens de couleur libre, "free persons of color") came into their own as an ethnic group, enjoying many of the legal rights and privileges of whites. They occupied a middle ground between whites and enslaved blacks, and as such often possessed property and received formal educations. After the Civil War, most Creoles of Color lost their privileged status and joined the ranks of impoverished former black slaves. All the while, however, the word Creole persisted as a term also referring to white Louisianians, usually of upper-class, non-Cajun origin (although, confusingly, even Cajuns sometimes were called Creoles, primarily by outsiders unfamiliar with local ethnic labels). Like the Creoles of Color, these white Creoles (also called French Creoles) suffered socioeconomic decline after the Civil War. In Acadiana, newly impoverished white Creoles often intermarried with the predominantly lower-class Cajuns, and were largely assimilated into Cajun culture.

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Posted by mark - January 24, 2016 at 5:31 pm

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Louisiana Crawfish Company

A virtual tour of the Louisiana Crawfish Company.

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Posted by mark - January 23, 2016 at 5:15 pm

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Mamou, Louisiana – “The Cajun Music Capital of the World”

Cajun music is just one of many music forms originating from Louisiana.

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Posted by mark - January 17, 2016 at 2:35 pm

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For men who find Louisiana Creole women unattractive?

Why? No one ever gives a direct answer, they simply say "they are not my type" or "I’m just not interested in them."

Is it their physical appearance? Culture and customs? Maybe embarrassment you’ll bring to your family? And for men that don’t find Louisiana Creole women attractive, is it because of all the old stereotypes you are *afraid* a Louisiana Creole woman might have?

I’m not getting it.

It’s the hoodoo.

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Posted by mark - January 12, 2016 at 12:33 pm

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louisiana culture fest

yep.
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Posted by mark - January 11, 2016 at 12:02 pm

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Oil Spill Threatening Fishing Economy, Culture in Louisiana

U.S. authorities have expanded fishing restrictions in the Gulf of Mexico because of fears of contamination from the BP oil leak. The spill poses a threat to the safety of seafood from the Gulf, and the future of the fishing industry in Louisiana and nearby states. VOA’s Brian Wagner has more.

Duration : 0:3:25

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Posted by mark - January 7, 2016 at 11:01 am

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Southeastern US Culture?

What do you consider the culture of the Southeast US — particularly Georgia, Florida, Alabama, North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana?

I’m not talking about banjo pickin’, cousin marrying Jerry Springer junk. I’m talking about the real way things are. Please also include where you are and how much (if any) time you’ve spent in the areas I listed.

Thanks in advance!

The culture is southern American, which includes, but is not limited to …

– Heavy Christian culture, Christianity is everywhere, lot’s of churches everywhere

– Standard American consumerism and materialism. Wal-Mart, fast food, billboards

– Politically right-wing, social conservatism, this is influnced by the heavy religion

– College football, NFL, NASCAR, trips to Myrtle Beach/Gulf Coast

– Country music, Christian music

– The confederate culture movement … not all people in the southeast are part of this, but some in the south do believe the culture should include the history of the area being part of the confederate states. This is expressed by displaying the confederate flag, supporting confederate history events, etc.

None of the above applies to south Florida, except for the standard American stuff like consumerism and materialism. Most of the above applies to PARTS of North Carolina, but not as much as the rest of the southeast. I’d say the heart of all of the above would be Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, South Carolina.

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Posted by mark - January 4, 2016 at 9:29 am

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History of Jazz, Louisiana

Learn about the unique history of Jazz in Louisiana

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Posted by mark - December 29, 2015 at 6:49 am

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I Should Have Never Fell In Love

Wayne Toups sings at Rox a song seldom played on radio, cant understand why, you listen to the words, it is a beautiful song that was writen by (a very young)Travis Thibodeaux. Both are artist’s from South Louisiana. This was filmed by my cell phone but still sounds great. Two good artists one touching love song if ever there was one, this is the ONE!

Duration : 0:4:43

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Posted by mark - December 20, 2015 at 3:00 am

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LOUISIANA CREOLE FLAG

Pete Bergeron designed the Louisiana Creole flag in 1987 and, in 1995, the Lafayette-based organization C.R.E.O.L.E., Inc., a heritage preservation group, adopted the flag to represent the cultural and ethnic diversity of Creole Louisiana. Dolores Kay Conque, Bergeron’s sister, hand-stitched the first Creole flag.

The upper left section, a white fleur de lis on a blue field, represents Louisiana’s French heritage. On the lower left and upper right sections, West African heritage is represented, respectively, by the flags of Mali and Senegal. Spanish colonial heritage is depicted by the Tower of Castille — a gold tower on a red field — positioned at the lower right section of the flag. A white cross dividing the four quadrants serves as a symbol of religion in the region.

Historically, Louisiana Creoles share deep cultural and kinship ties not only with Mediterranean Europeans, West Africans and Native Americans, but, as well, with the people of Cuba and Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic).

Duration : 0:4:18

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Posted by mark - December 1, 2015 at 8:06 pm

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