Louisiana Culture

What is Shreveport, Louisiana like? I am moving there from Ohio, and everyone sais I will be in for a culture?

shock………Is this true?

kinda but then again not really because a lot of the original people are gone. i’m pretty sure u will see a lot though. the culture is different but it’s really wonderful.

4 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - August 4, 2015 at 9:14 am

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , ,

Cool “Louisiana Culture” images

Some cool Louisiana Culture images:

The Old U.S. Mint, New Orleans


Image by louisianatravel
Phototgraphy of Louisiana Tourism Locations & Events – Peter A Mayer Advertising / Assoc. Creative Director: Neil Landry; Account Executives: Fran McManus & Lisa Costa; Art Production: Janet Riehlmann

Savoy Music Center, Eunice, La


Image by louisianatravel
Phototgraphy of Louisiana Tourism Locations & Events – Peter A Mayer Advertising / Assoc. Creative Director: Neil Landry; Account Executives: Fran McManus & Lisa Costa; Art Production: Janet Riehlmann

1 comment - What do you think?
Posted by mark - July 28, 2015 at 5:46 am

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , ,

Louisiana culture and Anderson are together fwkjr

Created on June 29, 2010 using FlipShare.

Duration : 0:5:5

Read more…

5 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - July 21, 2015 at 3:34 am

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags:

Oil Spill Threatening Fishing Economy, Culture in Louisiana

U.S. authorities have expanded fishing restrictions in the Gulf of Mexico because of fears of contamination from the BP oil leak. The spill poses a threat to the safety of seafood from the Gulf, and the future of the fishing industry in Louisiana and nearby states. VOA’s Brian Wagner has more.

Duration : 0:3:25

Read more…

8 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - July 11, 2015 at 10:15 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Economic Impact of Louisiana Tourism

Louisiana Tourism IS Economic Development

Theres nothing bland about Louisiana Tourism. Our culture and history are intertwined with our food and music. We live to eat and after experiencing our distinctive cuisine, visitors understand why. Weve known all along that Louisiana is a restaurant with a remarkable cultural menu, and the world has an insatiable appetite.

Brought to you by The Louisiana Travel Promotion Association: http://www.LTPA.org

and the Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism: http://crt.louisiana.gov/tourism

Become a Fan http://www.facebook.com/LouisianaTravelPromotionAssociation

Duration : 0:1:1

Read more…

7 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - July 2, 2015 at 6:43 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , ,

KnowLA, the Online Encyclopedia of Louisiana History and Culture

The Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities is developing an online encyclopedia of Louisiana history and culture. KnowLA will be a comprehensive, dynamic online reference on the peoples, places, cultures, events, and institutions of Louisiana. The site will include entries with images, streaming audio and video files, as well as interactive timelines integrated into the texts. KnowLA will also offer resources and activities for teachers and students. The encyclopedia will be available free to users and will be accessible from any computer.

Duration : 0:9:34

Read more…

5 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - June 27, 2015 at 5:12 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

(2) T K Hulin SoyBean Festival (Mid 1980’s)

Featuring “T K Hulin (The King) “Swamp Pop” Down home Louisiana music, with the style and performance only T K can give. Another Kenny G Productions, filmed on site at the Soybean Festival (mid 1980’s) in Milton Louisiana. Transcribed from an old VHS that weathered well to a movie of today’s time. Watch and step back in time with us as we take you back to a memorable moment.

Duration : 0:5:17

Read more…

4 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - June 25, 2015 at 4:31 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

what culture or group of people lived in Louisiana by the 1840?

the book a lesson before dieing was written by enest gaines who lived in the 1840

ACADIAN-CAJUN

13 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - June 23, 2015 at 3:58 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 3

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:4:52

Read more…

4 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - June 20, 2015 at 2:59 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 2

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:6:4

Read more…

13 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - June 16, 2015 at 12:37 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Next Page »