Archive for August, 2010

Can you drive a vespa on the interstate in louisiana?

I’d like to get one because they’re much cheaper than a car, and great on gas, and I only travel within about 30-40 miles from where I live, But that’s using the interstate, so…?

If you are talking of real actual Vespa your can use 50cc scooters not use on Interstate. The 150cc Vespa scooters can use Interstate *legally* but can only do about 59mph and is not safely on the Interstate.

The Vespa 300cc scooters are 80mph on the Interstate.

6 comments - What do you think?
Posted by admin - August 30, 2010 at 3:25 am

Categories: Louisiana Travel   Tags:

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 2

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:6:4

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Posted by admin - August 29, 2010 at 4:54 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Creole Common Routes; St.Domingue (Haiti) – Louisiana Part 1

From the pots of red beans and rice bubbling in French Quarter restaurants to the amulet bags for sale in neighborhood botanicas, Haitian influence is seen, heard and tasted across this city. French colonists from Saint-Domingue — later renamed Haiti — had traveled to New Orleans since the early 1700s. That connection flourished in 1809 and 1810, when 10,000 refugees arrived in New Orleans from Saint-Domingue. Those numbers were later strengthen with another migration wave of 15,000 in the 1820s. The refugees were a combination of French colonists, their slaves and free people of color who had fled the slave uprisings.The refugees doubled the city’s population and infused New Orleans with Franco-Caribbean traditions, including theater companies, elaborate dances and black political activists. Also, as Saint-Domingue’s lucrative sugarcane fields burned during the revolution there, New Orleans’ sugar industry soared. A lot of the things about New Orleans we view as unique came from those Haitian refugees. New Orleans is the most Haitian city in America, much more than Miami or New York. Essentially all of the surviving whites (along with some of the gens de couleur) became refugees. Approximately 10,000 French refugees came to the Gulf Coast larger than the population of New Orleans and Mobile at the time (8,000 and 810 respectively). These Saint-Dominguens made a significant contribution to the Gulf Coasts creole culture. Saint-Dominguens included John James Audubon, Louis Moreau Gottschalks family, and (likely) Marie Laveau and Jean Laffitte. Black refugees to Louisiana brought with them elements of African and Haitian culture in the form of voodoo/hoodoo practices, shotgun house architecture, and the language, oral traditions, and dance steps of Mardi Gras Indian rites.

Duration : 0:4:1

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Posted by admin -  at 4:54 pm

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pleaseshare if you have a really good recipe for fresh boiled schrimp. I don’t want them overly cooked?

Prefer a Louisiana recipe. Need step by step instructions.

louisiana shrimp creole

INGREDIENTS
1/2 cup finely diced onion
1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper
1/2 cup chopped celery
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 (14.5 ounce) can stewed tomatoes
1 (8 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 dash hot pepper sauce
1 pound medium shrimp – peeled and deveined
DIRECTIONS
In a 2 quart saucepan, melt butter or margarine over medium heat. Add onion, green pepper, celery, and garlic; cook until tender.
Mix in cornstarch. Stir in stewed tomatoes, tomato sauce, Worcestershire sauce, chili powder, and red pepper sauce. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Stir in shrimp, and cook for 5 minutes.

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Posted by admin - August 27, 2010 at 11:30 am

Categories: Louisiana Cooking   Tags:

SOS, hurry !!!!!!!!! girlls only?

I need to find websites on online contests including beauty contests, summer jobs and sports in Louisiana, find all and get 10 pts, on May 13, please don’t give me a bullshit answer, it’s serious, cause i need to get away from all this racket at home during the summer, also to work with kids, arts and crafts, and fashion contests

you should try workforstudents.com or seventeen.com

11 comments - What do you think?
Posted by admin - August 23, 2010 at 11:37 am

Categories: Louisiana Sports   Tags:

Louisiana

Talking about our vacation to my Grandmother’s

Duration : 0:10:0

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Posted by admin -  at 6:56 am

Categories: Louisiana Travel   Tags: , , ,

T. Lee Horne, III for Governor Music Video

Music Video of the T. Lee Horne, III Campaign for Governor of Louisiana. The music is by Lil’ Nuke.

Duration : 0:3:29

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Posted by admin -  at 6:56 am

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

I Should Have Never Fell In Love

Wayne Toups sings at Rox a song seldom played on radio, cant understand why, you listen to the words, it is a beautiful song that was writen by (a very young)Travis Thibodeaux. Both are artist’s from South Louisiana. This was filmed by my cell phone but still sounds great. Two good artists one touching love song if ever there was one, this is the ONE!

Duration : 0:4:43

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Posted by admin -  at 6:56 am

Categories: Louisiana Culture   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Where can I get crawfish in Southern California?

I live in the northern Orange County area but I used to live in northern Louisiana. I know they’d be having Mudbug Madness in a couple of months and it’s killing me… I haven’t had boiled crawfish in over 10 years! I hear there’s crawfish inside this very strict state (as far as allowing seafood and the like to cross its borders). But where can I get any?

I never did cook it myself and I’m not so fond of food poisoning as to start now, besides which my husband and kids would probably (absolutely) refuse to try it.

Is there a restaurant in Southern California that serves boiled crawfish in season? Failing that, is there at least a restaurant that serves a crawfish meal that has enough meat in it to be able to tell you’re eating it and not chicken?

Please don’t suggest shrimp. I don’t know who could confuse the two but I never could tolerate the texture of shrimp or lobster.

Try Bayou Grill in Inglewood. The address is 1400 N La Brea Avenue. I’ve never been to the bayou but the crawfish here is pretty good and doesnt taste like shrimp.

7 comments - What do you think?
Posted by admin - August 20, 2010 at 11:44 am

Categories: Louisiana Cooking   Tags:

country music and the south?

I have to do a presentation for a class about southern culture.

I chose "How country music has inpacted the southern US states [Louisiana, Texas, Florida, ect.]"

Can you guy give me any ideas of songs to present, or maybe even a description? I’m talking real country by the way, maybe something like Johnny Cash’s generation of country music.

Don’t worry, I’m not asking you to write me a whole paper.
Maybe just a couple brief points?

It’d really help me out a alot :)

I respect all genres of music. Country western music was derived from blue grass music. PBS had documentaries on this. Classic country is the music from Johnny Cash’s generation. Best wishes! :)

9 comments - What do you think?
Posted by admin -  at 11:44 am

Categories: Louisiana Music   Tags:

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